No. 1 Braemar rd

Corner Wessels & Braemar Rd

Greenpoint, Cape Town

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Mon - Fri: 8:30am - 5pm  ​​
Sat & Sun: CLOSED

SHOP:

WAREHOUSE:

V&A WATERFRONT:

Mon - Sun: 9am - 9pm

Shop 6147

Lower Level

Victoria Wharf Shopping Centre

Shop 1B

The Promenade

Victoria Road

Mon - Sun: 9am - 9pm

CAMPS BAY:

1/5

What you will find here is a great selection of the very best pieces chosen from a variety of bigger collections, all picked for their good form, attention to detail and authenticity. Everything is hand-made and it is evident that these products are in the highest level of handmade product you can get from the various regions. It is all about the intensiveness of labour that has gone into the pieces and the high level of craftsmanship. In this day and age, it is amazing and gratifying to see that such levels of craftsmanship still exist.

 

What we look for are accent pieces, items that are chosen to bring about some curiosity as to what the item could have been, or what its purpose was. Generally the pieces end up in very different contexts to their origins.

 

Out of this World was established in 1996 by Peter and Sue Vith, gaining inspiration from Peter’s mother, Paula Vith, who founded Out of Africa in the 70s. Her travels engendered a love and admiration for the rich treasures to be found on the African continent. Paula's vision led her to establish and cultivate trading ties with communities there. A real innovator, she was one of the first people to bring tribal art and furniture to South Africa.

 

Peter and Sue have gone on to travel extensively, nurturing and establishing relationships with suppliers in Africa, India and Oceana. As a result, they have strong bonds and connections with traders and suppliers who bring collections to the ‘warehouse’ in Cape Town, from which they are able to hand-pick the best pieces available.

 

“For our African pieces, we have a very steady group of traders who we’ve dealt with for 20 years, who know what we’re looking for. They spend up to six months travelling through a lot of these regions, collecting things. These traders can get into fairly inaccessible, far-out places that would be difficult for us to visit ourselves. They, in turn, have their own networks there and generally do a better job of collecting there than we could realistically do these days,” says Peter.

 

“Obviously when it comes to India and the East, we travel to these places and source the pieces ourselves. Bali is a kind of fairly-well recognized central point for collecting,” he adds.